The MBTI Test, Carl Jung, and satan

One of the saddest effects of religion that we can see in today’s world, in particular, is the notion that medical science cannot take the place of God (which is true)… such that we should solely rely on God and not medical science for health and healing (ugh).

There’s a simple allegory that I’ve heard online (and I’ll try to keep it short):

A man was stranded in a flood. His home was swallowed by water, except for a small portion of roof… and he was sitting on that small portion for dear life, calling out “God, please help me!”

Suddenly, a man calls out from a raft a short distance away and says “hey, come on in!” The stranded man calls out: “I rely on my God. Go ahead without me while I wait for God.” The raft leaves, and the man calls out once again: “Lord, where are you? Please help me!”

Shortly after, a helicopter comes and brings down a line. The stranded man calls out: “I rely on my God. Go ahead without me while I wait for God.” The helicopter leaves, and the man calls out once again: “Lord, where are you? Please help me!”

Within seconds, the flood increases, and the man drowns.

He arrives in heaven at the feet of Jesus, and the man looks up and asks: “Why did I have to die in that flood? Where were you when I called out? I asked you for help!”

Jesus replied: “I sent a raft and a helicopter for you. That was more than enough.”

There’s a new issue in the YouTube Christian community relating to the MBTI test. There is a segment of (I’ll be nice and call them “tin-foil-hat-wearin'”) Christians who say that this test – commonly used in many churches – including the one that I attend – is from satan.

The primary premise is two-fold: (a) since the test is not mentioned in the Bible, it must have come from satan; and (b) it stems from theories created by anti-theist and psychologist Carl Jung.

And, it saddens me to watch a number of Christian brothers and sisters buying into this nonsense. This is the same kind of nonsense that Jehovah’s Witnesses use to justify no blood transfusions.

For the church, the fact is that the MBTI is a simple tool to help individuals find a ministry that will match their personality preferences.

As Christians, to condemn the test because it is based on theories of an anti-theist, therefore, requires us to reject everything that came from a non-believer… including medicine, scientific theories, medical research, etc. It is patently ridiculous.

Here are some samples of the “satanic” MBTI test, where you answer a series of questions with a YES or NO:

• You are almost never late for your appointments.
• Strict observance of the established rules is likely to prevent a good outcome
• You often think about humankind and its destiny
• You find it difficult to speak loudly
• The more people with whom you speak, the better you feel

See the whole test here.

What do you think?

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In May, 2005, Rob was a secular, Jewish, thirty-something, Los Angeles, personal injury attorney whose idea of getting up early on a Sunday was getting up for the third quarter of the first televised, NFL games.

Thirsting on the idea of playing in a band for the first time in a decade, Rob finally accepted his neighbor's request to get up at seven-in-the-morning on Sundays in order to participate.

Eleven months later, his world was turned upside down by Jesus. Instantly, he began leading songs on the worship team and, today, he now leads that same LIFEhouse worship team in which he was initially invited to join as a non-believer.

God is cool like that.